Monday, April 23, 2018

OTI:one poem, notes:4/23/18

Open To Interpretation
 
Sketch For Sonnet
 
Opening, inside I see the welter:
Balsa wood pieces unassembled--
Propeller, rubber band, tissue paper--
Instructions to be deciphered

Khufu's boat

Mayan hieroglyphs

Someone could have just explained it all,
Like the fascination with Mickey Mouse.
 
DolphinWords
 
Notes: Angels game came on early...forgot they were in Houston...bottom of second...thought, which is silly, is to do these posts while the Angels games are in progress, or in close proximity, like when I come back from seeing one live...that may be a longer row to hoe than I can do...season has a hundred and sixty games...but...I've done the like before!...anyway...this fourth post...see previous...
I remembered the Egyptian god Geb is in a relining pose too like the Chacmools, and Pakal in the 'astronaut' pose...are they falling, rather than reclining on the ground?...Pakal is associated with maize, Geb with wheat...thought to see what the gods of rice look like...DewiSri is knockdown gorgeous...and still worshipped in Indonesia side by side with Islam...one thing wheat, maize, rice gods have in common is being androgynous...that, and snakes...
oh, the 'Sketch For Sonnet'...this is how one of mine looks starting out...I have the conceit...a balsa wood model in its box just opened...and what I wanted to reach for is that the instructions are without words...just drawings with arrows and parts numbers indicating what goes with what, and the order of assembly...now, beneath the Great Pyramid was found a wooden boat, disassembled...and just made of ropes and wood...and without instructions...its been put together...and early on, a fellow who was independently wealthy, as he was married to a rich girl from California, involved his time in an unheralded effort to meticulously copy with painting and drawing all the Mayan hieroglyphs he could find...this when everything covered by jungle still...that I learned this by watching a youtube clip in the wee hours of a lecture by Michael Coe about Mayan hieroglyphs...so, the sonnet's elaborated conceit would try to reach for the puzzling something out without much help...or instructions that are minimal...thought is what has come down to us from ancient cultures is like minimalist instructions, or, in the case of the Khufu boat, and Mayan Hieroglyphs, no instructions at all....obvious of the balsa wood model is that it is an airplane, obvious of the Khufu boat was that it was a boat...it's a big help if you know what something is supposed to be!...the Mayan hieroglyphs didn't give a clue, until it was noted the numbering, and then the calendars...that's something all the ancient cultures had in common--numbers and calendars...the temples, and stories, oriented to the seasons and the stars...end of four...no scores yet...
since van Daniken noted Pakal looks like an astronaut, everyone has been scouring ancient things for ancient astronaut stuff...brb...

quote

The idea that ancient astronauts existed is not taken seriously by academics, and has received no credible attention in peer reviewed studies.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_astronauts

unquote

for the sonnet I'm trying to think up a couplet too for the end that has a horde of starwars figurines buried and dug up far in the future, and the future is amazed that we had space travel and contact with aliens!...of course we know better...all that is from the movies...and I'm wondering if that is what we are finding in the ancient cultures...'movie' things...near as I can tell, there are no spaceships depicted, but there is no shortage of fantastic things from somewhere...
when I was a kid, it had to have been something of a shock to open the pages of Nat Geo and read about the Ancient Egyptians and their dung beetles...right there on King Tut's chest, a pectoral with a scarab...wonderfully rendered, but still, a dung beetle rolling a ball of dung!...it may as have well have been a tangled ball of thread...and I've been trying to unravel it for months now...it was the start of these posts, but hung fire...Valbuena gets a hit...first hit through five...this happened in the last game in the Boston series, no hit through five...and yesterday they were no hit through six...this is not good!...a walk, and single by drought ridden Calhoun...his first hit in like eighteen at bats...there's a bug on some island near New Zealand that went extinct, it was thought...a ship wreck populated the island with rats which ate all the bugs in short order...but some recent rock climbers on another nearby island, a pinnacle (I have this fascination with pinnacles now having done the Pinnacle Race Black Deck Tale--see moveTombRaider!), found some surviving bugs...Tree Lobsters they are nicknamed...and these bugs, somewhat uniquely for bugs, mate, male with female, loyally, though the females can give birth too without mating...which is a boon to the bug folk...a few bugs have been sent here and there to establish populations, and insure they wont go extinct again!...they lay eggs like in the thousands...I could make an allusion from that for the archaeologists digging up Aztec things...early Christians buried them, least they continue, and there is voiced a concern that digging them back up will reestablish the savagery of the Aztecs...we may not be immune to contamination by former cultures!...brb...

quote

Caltiki, The Immortal Monster (Italian: Caltiki, il mostro immortale) is a 1959 black-and-white science fiction-horror film. The film's storyline concerns a team of archaeologists investigating Mayan ruins who come across a creature that is a shapeless, amorphous blob. They manage to defeat it using fire, while keeping a sample of the creature. Meanwhile, a comet is due to pass close to the Earth, the very same comet that passed near the Earth at the time the Mayan civilization collapsed, raising the question: "Is there a connection between the creature and the comet"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caltiki_%E2%80%93_The_Immortal_Monster

unquote

a recurring refrain in the movies!...Angels got another run...Pujols walks, two on two out...Valbuena up again...K...bottom six...Sumerian gods of wheat?...brb...

quote

Nidaba...was the Sumerian goddess of writing, learning, and the harvest.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nidaba

unquote

That!, that's very good!...harvesting, planting, and such, can allude to writing, reading and learning and such...but there is another Sumerian harvest I've been curious about...brb...well, Sumerian god Dumuzi is together with Innana and both together with Date Palms...but I can't find a good quote to snag...there are some, but inside books...wiki's letting me down!...much is made of the winged eagle headed being with a bucket in one hand, and a pine cone in the other, standing before a tree...this works out to the bucket having pollen in it, and the pine cone, or pine cone looking thing, a way to spread the pollen on the tree, which is a date palm...spreading pollen on date palms is familiar to date palm farmers to this day...I need to go to the store and get some dates!...this icon is found on the Sumerian palaces--now in museums...I don't know what the Eagle head and wings are about...the allusions of these icons are lost...the 'assembly' in all this is to re-discover the allusions!...difficult as so many see illusionary allusions!...the bucket is compared to what looks like a bucket held by the Tula Warriors...and from there more ancient astronaut conjectures...hmmph...brb...

quote

Kisilevitz tells Megan Gannon at LiveScience that they are not certain if the toads were buried as a posthumous snack. The Egyptians considered toads a symbol of regeneration, and that may have influenced the choice of offering. But the decapitation may be an indication the toads were prepared as food, similar to the way indigenous people in South America remove the head and toes of frogs to more easily remove their toxic skin, reports Borschel-Dan.
Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/jar-headless-toads-found-bronze-age-tomb-180965031/#bkVtxYxj0WVLgmd2.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
 
unquote
 
routinely I do a 'news archaeology' search, and just back two posts while I was going on about magic toads, that showed up...and I had to wonder if the heads had been ingested for their hallucinating toxins...a dogear....but in the jar too was date pollen, which was unusual, as date palms not native to Jerusalem...thought is an orchard had been planted and maintained...I imagine along with it came Innana and Dumizi...early Israelites held to pagan gods, much as I imagine the Indonesians worship Sri while holding to Islam now...one inning to go!...Angels hanging on--2-0...9th...Pujols up...Dumizi is mixed up with, or is, Tammuz...brb...
 
quote
 
Then he brought me to the door of the gate of the LORD'S house which was toward the north; and, behold, there sat women weeping for Tammuz. 15Then said he unto me, Hast thou seen this, O son of man? turn thee yet again, and thou shalt see greater abominations than these.
 
Ezekiel 8
 
unquote
 
hmmph...come on guys...tying run at the plate...bottom of 9th...Middleton pitching...walk...no outs...1st and 2nd...k...K...play at third under review...pass ball throw 'm out...he's out!...a halo over this one!...lol...
 
more tomorrow morrow...
 
:)
 
DavidDavid
 

Sunday, April 22, 2018

OTI:two poems, notes:4/22/18

Open To Interpretation

Store
 
Nothing's ever certain when I walk into your store.

Memoralbilia

The Homeridae beneath the Dodona Oak, a Springtime breeze in the leaves...

It's every wheres' sound...
How's that?
The waterfall's loud...
A beach with long continuous ocean waves...
On the stone benches, the audience visiting before the play...
A quietous...
Where is beyond beyond?
Below below...
Above above...
Beside beside...
The stars are loud...
Silence between the galaxies...
He's found Boccaccio...
Petrarch: My friend.
 
DolphinWords
 
Notes:  Dodger and Nationals on the radio...Angels and Giants earlier...Giant's Panik took twenty one pitches by Angels' Barria in one at bat...a new record...and a remarkable one!...how that happens is the batter keeps fouling off the ball...a Dodger player got hit by pitch for the 200th time...now 19th on that list...Angels lost 2-4...Dodgers trying to come back...trailing by a couple I think...
Boccaccio wrote a long book of the Greek gods and myths, but it's in Latin, and apparently never yet translated entire...part of it recently...and he wrote the Decameron...it has a 'frame' not unlike what I thought up for the Black Deck Tales...read the first one...there are a hundred!...and it's good!...a merchant needs to go on a business trip, and leaves a friend, who happens to be a Mafioso, to manage his affairs, collect debts, while he is away...the Mafioso falls ill, and while in a monestaries care, presents a dilemma for the monks...he can't be buried in the graveyard because he's a criminal, but the Mafioso says not to worry, bring me a priest...and he commences to confess his sins to the priest, careful not to make them sound to harsh...and the priest forgives him for each one, telling him he's being righteous for confessing, and not to worry!...the Mafioso dies forgiven, and is buried in the graveyard, rather than else ware, 'like a dog'...but the story doesn't end there...the priest goes on and on to the public how righteous the Mafioso was in his confessions, which were just a kind of inside joke to the Mafioso, that he becomes regarded as a Saint, and his grave a holy spot of pilgrimage...apparently Boccaccio could take religious sorts to task, and this may be why his works obscure...there's some on the web, but not much...the Decameron is famous, and an influence in Shakespears'  era...religions are resilient in how they can absorb sarcasim and such...anyway...
too continue with Chacmools, see last two previous posts...I was up all night searching Mesoamerican iconographies...and more today...on Coatlicue's chest is a pectoral holding four severed hands and two cut out hearts arrayed just like the butterfly chestplate pectoral on the Chacmools and the Tule Warriors...let me back up a sec...
Dectective stories always begin with some crime, completely mysterious except that it is a menace, and if not solved, will manifest again...and the story brings in the detective who bit by bit gathers evidence until the truth is uncovered...trick in this, is to gather evidence with out jumping to conclusions!...or making false accusations...so, I'm just jotting down notes...for now!...
an odd thing is that the Incas didn't have chocolate, and conversely, Mesoamericans didn't have coca leaves...cocoa beans and coca leaves often get confused...so, Mesoamerica didn't culturally connect trade wise with South America?...a query...
I thought to look at Mayan iconography, and some of the kings have a pectoral called 'bar pectoral'...it has the distinctive six notches, but is very narrow...this is where I am now... brb...hmmp...tried to finish this post up and lost half of it...Dodgers won 4-3...as for the missing part, I can summarize, the Chacmools' pose is the same as Pakal's, the famous Mayan astronaut...brb...

quote

The king himself wears the attributes of the Tonsured maize god - in particular a turtle ornament on the breast - and is shown in a peculiar posture that may denote rebirth.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%27inich_Janaab%27_Pakal

too sleepy to rework it...onward...will catch it up with next post...dung beetles!

Butterfly Breastplates, Coatlicue's pectoral, Mayan Bar Pectoral, Ollin Glyph, Chacmools, Tule Warriors, Coatlicue, Tlaloc, Chaac, Pakal

:)

DavidDavid

 
 

 

Saturday, April 21, 2018

OTI:three poems and notes with one pic:4/21/18

Open To Interpretation
 
Housing

It's like we sleep in separate beds,
Me and the rest of humanity,
We go about our daily bread
Trying to keep our sanity.
It's not so bad...
Who am I kidding?

Star
 
There are stars,
There are actors,
And there are stage hands.
The audience hadn't a clue
I was in love with you.

Chickens Or Eggs

Who am I to say how it began,
Or how it will end?
Lol!
You can see the dilemma!
There is no before or after,
Every thing is simultaneous!
 
DolphinWords
 
Notes: hooey...the Angels/Giants game must have started early...4th--2-2...Pujols...K...last night was more meanness...almost bailed from my perch in the fifth inning...stuck around...wonderful dbl play by Simmons/Kinsley...double by Pujols...HR by Trout...a couple out of the strike zone, one high, one low, hits by Ohtani...not much to crow about...ah...Simmons hits a double...the Angels have a really entertaining team, both defensively and offensively...maybe not so much the pitching...anyway...game in progress tonight on my radio...7:30 about...old fellows follow baseball...and ponder ancient mysteries!...
More Chacmool...see yesterday's post...on the Chacmools chests is something called the 'butterfly breastplate'...it's on the Tula standing warriors too...they have the same headdresses too...I was pondering that before I went off on the mirrors...oh...on the Warriors' behinds is a decorative disc thought to have once been a pyrite mirror...was the breastplate too a mirror?!...the breastplate shows up as a glyp...the ollin glyp...no, wait...that's the centerpiece in the famous Aztec calendar...that shows up a lot...and it reminds me of the butterfly breastplate...maybe both have to do with the calendar...there are some statuettes of warriors with butterfly chest plates, and another plate like it in the headdress, but upside down...it is very very hard to track down a 'notice' like that!...and these other things...before the web, it was impossible just going to libraries, bookstores...now I can search these things out on the web...I'm going to have to post up a storyboard on the wall like detectives do!...looking at the breastplates on the warrior, one cant help but wonder something was on them...their flat smoothness a substrate, like the discs the chacmools have...maybe the pyrite mirrors...the odd position of the chamools is a puzzle...their like doing a sit up exercise crunch...the stomach muscles tensed...I've wondered if originally they were female...a woman giving birth...and I did find one Aztec drawing of a female on their back like the chacmool, their head not raised, and a snake emerging from their abdomen where the disc would be...a curio...while looking, took note of a clip showing how Incas might have cut stone with rope, water, and sand...backpacking, one carries a wire saw, and I've wondered my self about cutting stone with ropes...looked about, rope saws and such, and found clips of cutting limestone with saws...this modern...apparently, if one is cutting wet limestone, it is easy to cut with a saw...and the masons in the clip cut out nice smooth blocks pretty easily...the great Pyramid is mostly limestone blocks...so I looked up cutting stone with saws in ancient Egypt...and there's a clip of masons demonstrating using a long copper rectangular saw without sharp teeth...just notches...the soft copper imbeds with sand as it saws, and the sand's abrasion cuts the stone...it works...works better if wetted...and leaves the mysterious striations...and I thought, the rope would do this too maybe...then I went and contemplated the unfinished obelisk...still a puzzle...and then I thought, I need to reduce all this to the very basics, how Nature works stone....the first thing people say on seeing Yosemite Valley, is 'how did that happen?!'...oh...Trout and Marti with the scores...homeruns...still tied 2-2 bottom 6th...Belt hit two run HR  for Giants...hmmph....well, Half Dome was made by erosion, exfoliation. and glacier grinding, tectonic uplift...glaciers grind away with their bottoms which have collected abrasive stones and such...they leave 'glacial polish', and striations/scratches...a mile high glacier is pretty heavy, so they grind away pretty good!...the explanation for how the Valley was formed...oh...Pujols hit a two run HR!!!...basically, Nature shapes stones by grinding stones against stones...and moves them against one another with rain/rivers...there's other things, volcanos, water freezing and cracking...earthquakes...us...lol...I left off with all that, and wondered what the California Indians did with stone...they're artifacts are close by...and they had grinding stones...BoSox no hit in Oakland!...chortle...in the Valley there are outcrops of granite near the Black Oaks with holes in them for grinding acorns...and they had mortars and pestles, I think...in Egypt they ground wheat, in Mesoamerica, corn, China rice...mortars and pestles are world wide...now, stored away, is the memory of the clip of stone masons near Angkor Watt...if I remember right...on a wall relief was a picture of how stones were shaped...a kind of scaffold crossbeam held a hanging stone that was moved across the stone to be shaped...the narrator had one of these rigged up, but it didn't work too well grinding back and forth...but he was in a local quarry, and the workers came over and showed how to rotate the hanging grinding stone, and that worked fine!...go figure!...grinding stone against stone is worldwide...oh, heck, Sandoval an rbi...and old...mortars and pestle from 40,000 years ago...but to make pyramids and such, stone grinding stone, that seems so slow...and I thought of millstones...apparently, Mesoamerica doesn't have millstones...which begs the question, how did they grind corn for large populations!...millstones are all over Europe and Asia...did they do all their grinding in the New World with Metates?...thing I'm noting here is that the grinder shapes the stone below it, same as a pestle and mortar...that's done with rotation to make the mortar...pounding to grind the grain or corn...details!...anyway...that's where the contemplation is 'bout now...brb...
 
quote
 
A metate or metlatl (or mealing stone) is a type or variety of quern, a ground stone tool used for processing grain and seeds. In traditional Mesoamerican culture, metates were typically used by women who would grind lime-treated maize and other organic materials during food preparation (e.g., making tortillas). Similar artifacts are found all over the world,[1] including China.[2]

...
While varying in specific morphology, metates adhere to a common shape. They typically consist of large stones with a smooth depression or bowl worn into the upper surface. The bowl is formed by the continual and long-term grinding of materials using a smooth hand-held stone (known as a mano). This action consists of a horizontal grinding motion that differs from the vertical crushing motion used in a mortar and pestle. The depth of the bowl varies, though they are typically not deeper than those of a mortar; deeper metate bowls indicate either a longer period of use or greater degree of activity (i.e., economic specialization). The specific angles of the metate body allow for a proficient method of turning grains into flour.[3]
Another type of metate called a grinding slab may also be found among boulder or exposed bedrock outcroppings. The upper face of the stone is used for grinding materials, such as acorns, that results in the smoothing of the stone's face and the creation of pocked dimples
 
 
unquote
 
...are the chacmools metates?...a 'note'!...did Mesoamerica have anything like the Old World's millstones?...brb...Sweet!...Middleton saves it for Richards!...Angels 4-Giants 3...now I'm at cocaa beans!...I just saw in a passing the Aztec aristocracy didn't drink pulqui, the intoxicating cactus drink, but only chocolate...cocaa beans were used for money!...and they were ground too like corn...trying to narrow that...hmmph...
 
quote
 
Analogous to the mortar and pestle, the monolithic hand stone and quern – stone slab for grinding seed or grain substances into powder – are ubiquitous throughout history in nearly every culture. Archaeologists and anthropologists believe the mano ( derived from the Spanish word for hand) and metate (quern in Spanish) were the primary tools for chocolate-based consumables in the Mesoamerican household since settlement around 2000 BC approximately through the 1800s.
 
 
unquote

apparently, grinding corn/cacao in the New World was very labor intensive...for women...and the mills with millstones across Europe and Asia unknown...both attached much religious thought to milling...and as a metaphor, the pole with a stone rolling around over a lower stone, grinding grain, was taken up...see book Hamlet's Mill!...brb...

quote

The eleven-page introduction, written by de Santillana, provides an excellent orientation to the authors' thoughts, motivations, goals, and conclusions. Shakespeare's Hamlet is traced back to the story of Amlohdi and from there to the Viking tale of Grotte's Mill. The popular Norwegian fairy tale called "why the sea is salt," recorded in the early nineteenth century, descends directly from the myth of Grotte's Mill. The Hamlet's Mill "essay" then moves farther afield, drawing in a huge amount of related cosmogonic imagery. We first move to Finland, where the incredible Sampo story-its forging and theft-provides detailed imagery describing a World Age shifting of the celestial "frame of time." From there to Iran, India, Polynesia, back to Greece, Egypt, Babylonia and China; even New World mythology fits the criteria. The entire discussion indicates that ancient people around the globe observed the slow shifting of the celestial framework, what we call the precession of the equinoxes. Among academics and without good reason, the suggestion of this knowledge in ancient times has been dismissed out of hand, and this is exactly the problem. It is considered to be so patently impossible that no rational examination of the mythic forms describing precession has ever taken place. Hamlet's Mill is the first study to seriously address this question. 

http://edj.net/mc2012/mill1.htm

unquote

hmmmp...the pole the millstone rotates around is compared to the earth spinning on its axis...that's how the metaphor begins...and the other things happening in the grinding add on with more metaphors...how it all pinned to the sky is probably humanities greatest invention...arrived at convergent, or cultural interaction, I don't know...Robert Graves dabbled with magic mushrooms, and in his hallucinations saw a frog with a jewel in its forehead...brb...

quote

The toadstone, also known as bufonite, is a mythical stone or gem that was thought to be found in the head of a toad. It was supposed to be an antidote to poison and in this it is not unlike batrachite, supposedly formed in the heads of frogs. Toadstones were actually the button-like fossilized teeth of Lepidotes, an extinct genus of ray-finned fish from the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. They appeared to be "stones that are perfect in form" and were set by European jewellers into magical rings and amulets from Medieval times until the 18th century.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toadstone

hmmph....wait!

quote

I have eaten the Mexican hallucinogenic mushroom psilocybe Heimsii in Gordon Wasson's company, with the intention of visiting the Mexican paradise called Tlal6can to which it gives access. The god Tlal6c, who was toadheaded, corresponded exactly with Agni and Dionysus.

https://www.math.uci.edu/~vbaranov/nicetexts/eng/mushrooms.html

...

What Graves is suggesting is that hallucinogens open to realms common to everyone...somewhat like dreams, I'd say...and best eschew drugs...but apparently while things like toads with forehead jewels show up across oceans, mundane things like technologies don't...Graves was a charlatan too in the vein of the youtube mysterians, though he vehemently denied he wrote 'potboilers'...just what his books, I, Claudius, are, if not soap operas, I dunno!...on that page he seems to suggest toads secrete a toxin that makes a crust on their head, the jewel, and ingesting that brings on the hallucinations...this is something I haven't much interest in nailing down!...but he references Tlaloc...brb...

quote

The chacmools of Chichen Itza and Tula depict young men with warrior attributes, while the chacmools of Michoacán depict elderly men with wrinkled faces and erect penises.[2] A chacmool from Guácimo, Costa Rica, combines human and jaguar features and grips a bowl.[3] The face of the figure looks upwards and the bowl was apparently used to grind foodstuffs.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chacmool

unquote

oh!...a dogear (note)!...Tlaloc?...brb...

quote--same wiki

Two chacmools have been recovered that were associated with the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital. The first was discovered in 1943, on the junction of Venustiano Carranza and Pino Suarez, about two blocks south of the temple itself. The second chacmool was excavated in the sacred precinct.[15] This is the only fully polychrome chacmool that has been recovered anywhere;[15] it had an open mouth and exposed teeth and stood in front of the temple of Tlaloc, the Aztec rain god; its sculpted bowl probably received heart and blood sacrifices.[16] This latter sculpture is by far the older of the two

unquote

quote

Tlaloc is also associated with caves, springs, and mountains, most specifically the sacred mountain in which he was believed to reside. His animal forms include herons and water-dwelling creatures such as amphibians,
...
The cult of Tlaloc is one of the oldest and most universal in ancient Mexico. Although the name Tlaloc is specifically Aztec, worship of a storm god like Tlaloc, associated with mountaintop shrines and with life-giving rain, is as at least as old as Teotihuacan and likely was adopted from the Maya god Chaac or vice versa, or perhaps he was ultimately derived from an earlier Olmec precursor. An underground Tlaloc shrine has been found at Teotihuacan.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tlaloc

unquote

that last bit references the cavern in yesterday's post, I think...brb...

quote

They scanned the earth under the Ciudadela, returning every afternoon to upload the results to Gómez’s computers. By 2005, the digital map was complete. The archaeologists explored the tunnel with a remote-controlled robot called Tlaloc II-TC, equipped with an infrared camera and a laser scanner that generates 3D visualization to perform three dimensional register of the spaces beneath the temple.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teotihuacan#Recent_discoveries

unquote

:)...anyway, let me see if I can find the jeweled toad...keeps slipping away...

quote

In years leading up to 1942, a series of murals were found in the Tepantitla compound in Teotihuacan. The Tepantitla compound provided housing for what appears to have been high status citizens and its walls (as well as much of Teotihuacan) are adorned with brightly painted frescoes. The largest figures within the murals depicted complex and ornate deities or supernaturals. In 1942, archaeologist Alfonso Caso identified these central figures as a Teotihuacan equivalent of Tlaloc, the Mesoamerican god of rain and warfare. This was the consensus view for some 30 years.
In 1974, Peter Furst suggested that the murals instead showed a feminine deity, an interpretation echoed by researcher Esther Pasztory. Their analysis of the murals was based on a number of factors including the gender of accompanying figures, the green bird in the headdress, and the spiders seen above the figure.[1] Pasztory concluded that the figures represented a vegetation and fertility goddess that was a predecessor of the much later Aztec goddess Xochiquetzal.

https://www.blogger.com/blogger.g?blogID=126979308348410557#editor/target=post;postID=8389096902116923222;onPublishedMenu=allposts;onClosedMenu=allposts;postNum=0;src=link

unquote

Graves references that mural for the toad...first discovered in 1942, and in 1974 the speculation that it depicts a goddess...Graves is like a cat landing on its feet...the toad?

quote

The bumps and warts on toads’ skins served an important purpose in Mexica religion as they secreted poisons that could cause hallucinogenic states used in ritual practice. The poison, called bufotenin, impacted the cardiovascular system and could be deadly when ingested in large amount. Therefore, to transport themselves to mind-altering states priests only consumed tiny quantities. According to Spanish chroniclers, the Mexicas boiled, ground, and licked toads to obtain the substance.
Pic 3: Aztec stone sculpture of a toad, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City
Pic 3: Aztec stone sculpture of a toad, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City (Click on image to enlarge)

Excavations of the Templo Mayor in Mexico City reveal that toads were the only amphibians the Mexicas left in ritual caches (offerings to the gods) at the site, often as offerings to the god of rain and water, Tlaloc. Mexica sculptors also carved toads into large and small stone sculptures. One particularly large and robust sculpture (Pic 3) emphasizes the hallucinogenic properties of the toad, as the sculptor carved circular, wide eyes and glands atop the head that...


http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/flora-and-fauna/frogs-and-toads

go figure!!!


Sweet are the uses of adversity;
Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in his head.

As You Like It--Shakespeare

:)

DavidDavid

 
 

 

Friday, April 20, 2018

OTI:one poem, notes with pic:4/20/18

Open To Interpretation

Chacmool

What can I claim from you, or you from I?
Some words I spent as was your beauty lent,
Misshapen wings impossible to fly,
Things unfinished that aren't that important.

Seeds beneath the rain know their destiny.
No path between this and that I gave thought,
Each very own peculiarity;
A battlefield where tumbleweeds fought.

Could I have been more important portent
Clearly in the obsidian mirror?
My allusions you would only resent,
Polished pyrite trying not to error.

They have their quick to find silvery war,
The pyramids' red streaming cinnabar.

DolphinWords


Notes: meanwhile, meanwhile, meanwhile...it's been mean!...the BoSox have been whopp'n my Angels...bottom of the ninth...Simmons up...base hit...Ohtani up...'who's had an 0 for 3 night...he's getting his cuts...grounded out, two Ks...everything inside...offspeed...another foul...2-2...all fastballs...sinker...K...sigh...Cozart...I've lost track of score...like 9-2...while printing up my ticket to see Allison Kraus...this August 9...fly out to RF Betts...Mookie the Menace...by now there are more Red Sox fans at the stadium than Angel Fans...I can attest as having been there for the previous two games of the 3 game set...K....8-2...what was it...10-1, 9-0, 8-2...well, we had done much the same to KC and Texas...still!...a worrisome stretch...concert tickets are problematic...an early purchase will be at the going rate, but then subsequent ticket sales are re-sales...and raised according to demand...insomuch as I was booted out of the menus when purchasing early, I was a bit suspicious of ticketmaster...now from another seller I get a ticket, and it's a resale of a ticketmaster ticket...hmmph...embarrassing to say how much...for me...though a usual price in Town for most...sitting in my 510-511 perches at the stadium I have a view of Town, the crowd, full for Ohtani in the first game, and the playing field complete...somehow prefer it to the lower seats...and I have enough acuity to read the close plays and where and what the pitches are from so far away...so okay!...tomorrow morrow, back to the perch for SF Giants... .... ...
Oh, the ancient mystery mysteries on youtube keep algrorithimacally being presented to me when I go to see the mlb highlight clips...these clips are really nice...and the comments a hoot...but intermixed are the mystery clips which I can't resist...there all the same, charlatans trying to stir up enough subsciptions to make a buck...which looks to be impossible from youtube's requirements to get paid!...but anyway, they're fun, and I double check things that really do look like mysteries with google web searches...wiki is fairly well grounded, sourcing real archaeologists and such...a refrain in the clips is to compare similar things in ancient cultures all over the world, and remark, how is this possible, gee golly?!...for instance...stone blocks in ancient Egypt, Peru, China, Mesoamerica, most everywhere, can be found to be joined together with metal clamps, butterfly clamps...the clamps are long gone, but the chiseled out holes they go in, are really distinctive...I thought about this, how such an innovation could spread worldwide before Columbus, way before, like 1400 BC...and came to the notion that the clamps are a take on a woodworking joinery...brb...hmmph...closest wiki mention at their wood joinery page is a the biscuit...need to be more specific!...brb...

quote

Dovetail keys or Butterfly joints have been used both in decorative and structural joints since ancient times. They were prominently used in construction of the Cairo Dahshur Boats, a type of Khufu ship from the Egyptian middle kingdom.[2]

unquote

and there is my reached for notion...these joints were used in boatbuilding and boats reached everywhere, as did carpentry...and stonemasons copied the joint...the Khufu ship was made with the Pyramids at Giza, so this is a long way back...there are a lot of similar technologies common to the Old World and the New...and just as many gaps!...Mesoamericans didn't have the wheel...the old World didn't have corn on the cob...there's no historical record of back and forth trade...and there's a mystery as to why there are stone monuments everywhere, especially pyramids...I can see where the carpenters' stonemasons' joinery technologies easily spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific across Europe, Asia, Africa...not so easy to see how they made it to the Americas...but there that butterfly clamp is way up in the Andes mountains!...go figure!...in zoology, you have parallel evolutions, where entirely different species fill the exact same eco niche, and come to look alike...Australia has a bunch of these...brb...convergent evolution is what I'm thinking of...does convergent explain the similarities around the world of ancient cultures?...I don't know...after Columbus the world knitted itself together, so the notion of invention independent of one another became moot...and if it was independent before, how long before!?...there's those really old cave paintings that look a lot alike, from Europe to Asia...just that we all have a penchant to invent things is the marvel...we see kindred when we see seagulls drop butter clams to crack them open...so, given that, invention, convergent is possible...no need for butterfly clamped ship timbers to find their way to everywhere...but wait!...I found a lost Phoenician!...some sites note this, some don't...in Alabama, there is a pre-Columbian Indian site where was found a clay disc and on its surface the image of an open hand with an eye in it, Fatima's hand it's called...and it's a common thing from ancient Europe to Asia, sometimes linked to very old goddesses, like Innana, and to the Phoenicians...so, so, is the image an independent convergent?, or did a Phoenician ship manage to make it to North America?...place is called Moundville, has a museum, and other artifacts with the hand and eye...now, I'm nearer what I'm reaching for!...on the back of the disc it is nearly blank, save for some circles...and there are other discs like it...and some other artifacts with the hand and eye too...but, those discs are called speculatively, 'palletts for mixing paints'...not so!...they are mirrors, I speculate, once surfaced with reflective pyrite...pyrite oxidizes and so it is gone from the discs...oh, thinking on this I just thought that the Egyptian Narmer Pallette, which is too thought a pallett for mixing cosmetics, was a pyrite mirror...brb...hmmph...anyway...in viewing a mystery clip I happened on mention of the 'smokey mirrors' the Mayans/Aztecs had...they were obsidian mirrors...Black Decks!...I went off, and now I am an expert on Mesoamerican mirrors!...pyrite mirrors have been found in Arizona...brb...

quote

Most of the mirrors were found broken, burned, and buried with cremated human remains, with 36 mirrors having been discovered in 16 separate graves. They were just one of the many signs of cultural interaction from Mesoamerica discovered at Snaketown — along with ceremonial ball courts, copper bells, and the remains of colorful macaws.

http://westerndigs.org/mesoamerican-fools-gold-mirrors-found-in-arizona-reveal-ties-to-ancient-mexico/

unquote

oh...re -visiting this, I see I missed that a ball court is there too!...but I get ahead of myself!...well, on one hand there is 'cultural interaction' and on the other 'convergent'...why does this remind me of the current 'witch hunt' in the news?...lol...anyway, pursuing the mirrors, I found myself contemplating the chacmools...if you have ever seen a tourist add for Cozumel you've likely seen one...it's a statue of a man lying down with his legs folded, and his back raised up...he doesn't have a back rest, but if you imagine someone sunning on the beach with one of those folding back rests, propped up, legs folded, holding on their tummy a book, or nowadays, a cell phone or tablet, a 'black mirror', you about have it...but, this fellow is where the Mayans spread eagle victims to be sacrificed, it's thought, and the disc on his chest a place to rest the heart, or a bowl for hearts...or maybe the disc is just to place offerings...one reels from the horror of it...and they are everywhere and everywhen in the old ruins in Mexico and Central America...and, but, one thought is that the disc, (these statues are all remarkable alike, and over a wide area of time and distance) may have been a mirror...or held an obsidian mirror...brb...here's one site that doesn't look scary...http://www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/artefacts/smoking-mirrors/kids
...bewildered reading about these mirrors, I found myself under one of the pyramids at Teotihuacan...archaeologist have found a tunnel there...its roof collapsed on a rainy day in one place, otherwise they wouldn't know it was there...and inside, mirrors...brb...

quote

Pyrite degrades with time to leave little more than a stain on the mirror back by the time it is excavated. This has led to the frequent misidentification of pyrite mirror backs as paint palettes, painted discs or pot lids. By the Postclassic period obsidian mirrors became increasingly common.

... ... ...

The association of the human eye with mirrors was so strong that stylised eyes were frequently used in Teotihuacan art as a substitute for the face of a mirror.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirrors_in_Mesoamerican_culture

unquote

hmmph...a hand with an eye...a mirror!...so, I was under the Pyramid of the Feathered Serpent, wondering about the mirrors, and along with them, there's a lake of mercury...now, if there is anything shiny like a mirror, it's mercury/quicksilver!...what a marvel...brb...

quote, same wiki

 Mirrors worn on the back and the chest could have served a dual protective function, deflecting physical blows as well as supernatural attacks. The mirror itself may have symbolised war in Teotihuacan; the combination of its association with fire and water may have been a precursor of the Aztec atl-tlachinolli, Nahuatl for "water-fire", the phrase that the Aztecs used for war.[1

unquote


Needless to say, the mysterians have gone bananas over this mercury, lots on web and youtube, and well they should...

quote

Let’s remember that the same Roman god Mercury, patron of speakers, travelers and merchants, is also a psychopomp, a god tasked with carrying souls to the afterlife. The element Mercury has also been found in Egyptian tombs, and is rumored to surround the underground necropolis of Chinese emperor Qín Shǐ Huáng Dì. Mercury’s “immortal” nature was also prized by early modern alchemists and was often alluded to in their references to the philosopher’s stone.

unquote

Mercury is the Greek god Hermes...now, the invention of 'mercury', its discovery, has to go way way back, and could well be independent...it comes from cinnabar, whose red color lends it being good painting pigment...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnabar#/media/File:Cinnabar_crystal_structure.png

quote

The primary prehistoric use of the mineral was grinding it to create vermillion, and its earliest known use for this purpose is at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük in Turkey (7000-8000 BC), where wall paintings included cinnabar's vermillion.

https://www.thoughtco.com/cinnabar-the-ancient-pigment-of-mercury-170556

unquote

hmmph...I would have thought, along with red ochre/hematite, very earliest artists would have had cinnabar...but the web sites date it to like five or six thousand BC...Mercury comes from heating(?grinding) cinnabar...I haven't seen this happen...brb...essh...there's a clip about mining cinnabar to get mercury to use in early nuclear power plants!...in California...thought was some stone age folk accidentally heating some cinnabar, which they were drawing with, and seeing the silver mercury come out of it...early metallurgy only included like gold, copper, and...mercury...and it is one of those natural wonders that metals come from stones...'water from rock'...well, I've gone past where I wanted to reach, to give a 'note' to Chacmool, my poem, and somehow lighten its grimness...one of the Egyptian mystery clips notes that the image on the Narmer Palette of Pharoah holding a bunch of captives by their scalps, and about to wack them with his mace, was repeated over and over in Egyptian 'art' for like five thousand years!...the Chacmools are like this...brb...

quote

The five that were found in secure architectural contexts were all placed within entrance areas near a ritual seat or throne.[13] The chacmools in Tula also had an association with thrones or raised seating platforms, either in front of the throne or at the entrance to a chamber containing a throne.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chacmool#Distribution

unquote

...even more pervasive than these, are the Mesoamerican ball courts...while at the ballgame in my perch, I was contemplating how persistent religions are, their rituals, buildings built just so, and so on, and realized I was looking at something similar...the baseball field...it is curious in its dimensions, as it is in its rules!...and the bounce in a baseball comes from the rubber balls invented by the Mesoamericans...before Columbus, Cortez more likely!, rubber was only known in the Americas...and the Mesoamericans started out playing rubber ball games right from the gitgo...those distinctive ball courts date back to like 1200BC...brb...

quote

Pre-Columbian ballcourts have been found throughout Mesoamerica, as for example at Copán, as far south as modern Nicaragua, and possibly as far north as what is now the U.S. state of Arizona.[5] These ballcourts vary considerably in size, but all have long narrow alleys with slanted side-walls against which the balls could bounce.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesoamerican_ballgame

unquote

I recall seeing in old NatGeos these courts (in sixth grade I made a mural for homeroom class day of Aztecs fighting Cortez!), and always wondered how it looked like when a game was in progress...wonder no more...youtube has a fine collection of revivalist ballers performing!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZYpRsxqfFg

meanwhile, writing this, my legs folded, keyboard on my lap, head propped with pillows...a sideways glance...

:)

DavidDavid











Saturday, April 14, 2018

OTI:one poem, notes:4/14/18

Open To Interpretation

Much

I haven't much
And belong with such
That rest in the Dodo's clutch.
Once your touch
Through the soft rabbits' hutch
Made us the world's nonsuch.

DolphinWords

Notes:  A thought is that only using rhymes one can think of on one's own should be a rule in making a poem...most often that's what I do...kind of a rule, limit, one might use doing crossword puzzles...as not using a dictionary, so I won't resort to a rhyming dictionary...but I get stuck and rhymezone on the Web is my favorite go to site...the danger is being side tracked by a rhyme word that doesn't fit the poem, its conceit...I got stuck at 'touch', found 'hutch'...reached for that with the rabbits as the antonyms for the Dodo!...and took note of 'nonsuch' in rhymzone's list...what's that mean!?...oh!...a fit!...and, 'nonsuch' doesn't show up in rhymezone's example lyrics... (a favorite thing to do is to look at these!)...in fact, it doesn't show up much anywhere!...a town in England, and a cute children's book on amazon!...so, so, much fun!...meanwhile, my angels weathered Richard's wild pitches...another win...13-3 now!...cold making for wild games back east!...tomorrow morrow Ohtani!

:)

DavidDavid

Thursday, April 12, 2018

OTI: one pic, nineteen poems, notes:4/12/18


 
Open To Interpretation
 
Declaritives
 
Times
 
Anyway, we live in thought crowded times.
 
Attention
 
The sun's not a shadow, the moon's not a reflection,
So why haven't I your attention?
 
Be
 
It's all make believe trying not to be.
 
Sure
 
Sure as rain touches every desert.
 
Insects
 
Insects are smart in their repeating ways.

Lapwings
 
The limping lapwings will lead you astray.

Lotto
 
We rubbed our lotto scratchers--no matches.

Glimpse
 
Glimpsed, walking by, an entire future.
 
 
from King Tut exhibit...

 
Before And After
 
So, you inherited before, as you will after.

 
Craftsmen
 
Woodcarver for King Tut, what made you cut?
Goldsmith, what miners' thirsts found your gleams?

 
Affection
 
Affection: her gentle hand on your shoulder;
Hawk's wing over your prone thigh.
 
Dreams
 
Painted figures in total darkness
Inhale your dreams.

Souvenirs
 
Tourists take away souvenirs of maybe heaven maybe hell.
 
Flies
 
I wouldn't lift a shovel for you,
Yet around you our thoughts
Swarm like flies.

Black
 
The air conditioning wasn't on...
That black sparkling un-focusing me.

 
Ostriches
 
I was on your chariot,
Chasing ostriches--
Just so we filed by and gone
Past your cluttered wonders.

Gaze
 
Oh, we all have that singular gaze in common-- reading.
 
Guardians
 
Still, your guardians in the shadows...
As if we're all burglars.
 
Sound
 
The wind today from the desert--
The sounds you heard we hear too.
 
DolphinWords
 
Notes:  Went to see the King Tut show yesterday.  Took a curious route to get there, Exposition Park in Los Angeles.  Wanted to avoid the freeways, and Silver's, my jeep's, death wobble.  Had work done to get it to pass smog test, and incidentally the mechanics inflated the tires to specs...too inflated I suspect, as nearly wobbled off the road!  Over inflation one of the ills that brings on the wobble.  So study maps now on how to get from here to there without freeways.  So, so, took Katella, which turns into Willow, and turned right at Main...confused at King Blvd. as it intersects Main as one way going wrong way to reach Park, but managed to get back over to Figueroa and in time for my 2 pm slot.  Took an hour and a half.  Coming back I braved the freeways...110-405-22...traffic jammed up so went slow.  An interesting transition on the surface streets from OC to LA...for sometime.  It was a hurried visit to the Science Museum.  Show lasts until January 2019, so maybe go again...meanwhile, my Angels are doing marvels...10-3 at the top of their division...and I have tickets for Boston on 17th and Yankees on 20th...tried to get tickets for Allsion Krauss at the OC Fair,  but ticketmaster messed with me...and now wants like 250 dollars for ticket...problem with buying just one I guess...oh, the unfairness of popularity!  

Sunday, April 8, 2018

OTI:one pic and notes:4/8/18

Notes: The first three Oakland batters struck out, and it was downhill from there for Oakland.  Ohtani was perfect through six innings.  A hard hit single in the seventh ended the spell...sorta.  Ohtani finished the inning with a 1-3 put out, and another K.  He had like twelve strike outs.  Trout, Home Run, Single, Walk, Pujols, rbi double, new kid Schempf, two walks, and then a Home Run over right field fence, near where I was sitting, C-130-18.  A field level seat difficult to watch from...neighbors' heads block view as they bounce around, and being a night person, I baked and burned in the sunlight!  Angels offense was so effective, it looked routine next to Ohtani's pitching, which in its way, looked routine too--like he could do this every time out!  Both his pitching delivery, and batting swing, have an easy grace about them.  Don't know if he feels as relaxed as he looks.  It is a wonder that is captivating fans, and putting opponents back on their heels, or knees as it were when they swat and miss at his split fingers!  Round about the third inning, my pen ran out of ink, and so a quick trip up to a concourse souvenir stand for a pen, and while I thought of it, a packet of baseball cards, Topps Opening Day--hopeful of an Ohtani card for a souvenir.  Everything of his had been sold!  44,742, but to look around, scatterings of empty seats--fans nowadays it seems spend much time in the shops and getting refreshments.  Next time I go back up to my perch--fans up there more raucous, cheering the Angels on.  And I can be in the shade in day games under the awning.
At the end, walking up the steps, I found a Dodger card on the cement--Kershaw a bit dinged up.  Dodgers took the Giants in ten, 2-1.
First thing home I checked ebay for the Ohtani rookie card's value and got a sleeve for it! 

:)

DavidDavid